It’s been well established that a high carb diet is needed to fuel performance.
 
Once the competition, game or training session has finished, it’s highly advised that you consume carbohydrates to start replenishing the fuel used.
 
Under normal circumstances, rates of glycogen replenishment post exercise becomes accelerated due to the muscle ability to uptake more carbohydrates on an hourly basis (~0-3 hours). This is known as the insulin independent phase of glycogen replenishment.
 
For ultra-fast recovery, this is a period we need to take advantage of.
 
However, when the muscle becomes damaged, the muscles ability to uptake carbohydrates becomes impaired, meaning that full recovery and replenishment of the muscle is compromised.
 
Way back in 1985, O’Reilly et al found that damaging eccentric exercise resulted in poor replenishment 10 days after exercise when on a moderate carb diet (360g/day) whilst being inactive.
 
This is probably due to muscle membrane damage which prevented efficient glucose uptake and utilisation. The enzyme within the muscle responsible for converting glucose into glycogen (stored form of glucose) was still highly active.
 
Therefore the muscle wants to replenish super–fast after exercise, but the ‘doors’ to the muscle (known as GLUT-4) won’t let them in.
 
There’s also evidence to suggest that the inflammatory cells present within the damaged muscle may compete for glucose which furthers impairs replenishment (Costill et al, 1990).
 
Long story short, if you want to be fresh for games and competitions, it probably isn’t a great idea to do heavy eccentric based weight training beforehand….and that’s just from a fuelling perspective.
 

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